Daily Post – Septembre 18th

Living through a pandemic

in the south of France

547 days in Carcassonne since

1st lockdown in March 2020

DAILY STATISTICS HERE

▫️ HOME NEWS DESK

After an excellent week away, I am back on line for a few days before I have to return to hospital to try and get rid of these nasty kidney stones.

✏️ Daily update

Thanks to the figures published by Santé publique France, L’Indépendant reports on the health situation in France and in the departments of Aude and Pyrénées-Orientales on Friday 17 September.

In Aude, 76 people with Covid were hospitalised on Friday (-1), a figure that is back to its mid-August level. Among these patients, 16 are being treated in critical care units (resuscitation, intensive care or continuous monitoring), 3 more than on Thursday. This indicator has fluctuated between 12 and 16 since the end of August.

The number of deaths has not changed since Wednesday 15 September, at 401. As for the incidence rate, it is continuing the fall that began on 9 August. It stands at 82.4 per 100,000 inhabitants in the sliding week from 8 to 14 September, a figure published this Friday.

Since the beginning of the epidemic, 1,462 people have been discharged from hospital, including 6 in 24 hours.

Less than 100 patients hospitalised in the Pyrénées-Orientales
In the Pyrenees-Orientales, 99 Covid patients are in hospital (-7), the lowest number since August 1st with 20 fewer patients since September 9th. Of these, 17 are in critical care (resuscitation, intensive care or continuous monitoring), one less. This figure is down by almost 23% since 8 September. The department deplores an additional death due to Covid in 24 hours, bringing the total to 401.

The incidence rate is still falling since its peak on 25 July at 637 and fell below 65 on Sunday. It is 64.5 per 100,000 population in the rolling week of 8-14 September, a figure published on 17 September.

Since March 2020, 1,717 people have returned home, including five in 24 hours.

Less than 1,900 patients in critical care in France
Nationally, there were 66 Covid deaths in hospital on Friday 17 September, bringing the total number of hospital deaths to 89,164. Adding the 26,779 deaths in nursing homes, since March 2020, 115,943 people have died from Covid, according to Santé publique France.

There were 9,070 people hospitalised (227 fewer than the previous day), including 1,891 in critical care, 61 fewer in 24 hours. The number of patients in critical care has not reached this level since 15 August.

France recorded 7,373 new cases in 24 hours, compared to 9,601 last Friday. With an average of 8,357 cases per day between 8 and 14 September, new infections are down by 28.3% over 7 days.

The incidence rate is also still falling in France. At 87.2 per 100,000 inhabitants, in the rolling week from 8 to 14 September, it is back to its mid-July level.

Since the beginning of the epidemic, 417,059 people have been able to return home, cured, including 505 within 24 hours.

In addition, Emmanuel Macron announced on Friday that the 50 million mark for first-time vaccinations, i.e. people who have received at least one injection, had been passed in France on Friday.

▫️ FAUX PAS (fo-pa): noun. A social blunder, indiscretion, or tactless act that violates social norms, customs, or etiquette. Literally means “false step” in French.

Something I came across on line and that I can confirm

Just reading the definition is enough to make you feel embarrassed to the core, am I right? How much more if you’re the one stuck in an actual socially awkward scenario?

Committing a social faux pas especially if you’re traveling in France can become some sort of a little disaster. To avoid committing these types of mistakes, better arm yourself with a list of knowledge concerning French taboos.

For starters, let’s look at what’s acceptable or not when it comes to speech. 

☀︎ Taboos in Small Talk and Conversations

1. If you can, it is so much more preferable to talk to a French person using their language. It doesn’t matter if you speak French badly or your pronunciation is way off. The point is to do your best. You’ll come across as respectful if you do so, instead of prattling off in your English. 

(Author’s note: Personally, I don’t really mind this. There could be other reasons why French people would rather talk in French than English, such as difficulty in pronouncing English words which could lead to feeling annoyed about having to speak in English. It’s not really all because we super love our language. Yes we do, but not to the point that we demand everyone to talk to us using French.)

2. In relation to number 1, you can use “bonjour!” to say hello. If you are truly at a loss on what to say in French, simply say “Je ne parle pas francais. En anglais, s’il vous plait.” This means, “I do not speak French. In English, please.” But the best thing is still to learn basic French phrases when traveling in France. 

3. Mind your tu and vous! In English, it doesn’t matter whom you’re speaking to, there is only one kind of ‘you’ word to use. In French, however, you may end up insulting someone if you don’t choose the right youTu denotes a familiarity or level of closeness with the person you’re talking to. Vous, on the other hand, shows formality and respectful distance. Make sure to choose the proper you for each situation. 

4. Conversation starters that may be popular in other cultures don’t sit well with the French. These include questions involving money or personal inquiries such as “what do you do for a living?”, “are you married?”“do you have kids?” Stick to safer routes such as French culture, art, food, music, philosophy, architecture, and popular events. Just make sure you know what you are talking about. 

5. Never ever flaunt your wealth during conversations. This is considered shameless and seen as bad taste. Your words will not be considered as a sign of good social status as well. 

6. Use the words Madame (for females), Mademoiselle (for young females), and Monsieur (for males) to address a person. The French are generally formal which is often the reason why they’re being regarded as aloof or cold. You can still be friendly and warm without going overboard. 

7. If you’re in France for business, avoid droning on and on about business talks during lunch. The French believe that there is more to life than working nonstop. Sit back, enjoy your meal, and talk about something else aside from business. There’s plenty of time for that when not in a table filled with good food. 

8. Break the ice with a quick “bonjour” followed by madame, mademoiselle, or monsieur. Always say “merci” (thank you) and  s’il vous plait (please). Good manners are awesome wherever you are. 

9. It is considered bad manners to ask questions about political preferences. Wait for the person to open up that sort of conversation; don’t jump into it. 

10. Praises and compliments about everything French (not criticisms) are rather favorable. 

11. Don’t launch into lengthy talks about your opinion on French leaders and history. 

☀︎ Actions and Gestures

Just like individuals have their own sets of quirks or little personal issues that they take offense about, so do nations and different parts of the world. A harmless gesture to you might come across as incredibly rude to others. The key is to take note of these little cultural differences.

When you’re talking to a French person and especially if you’re in France, always be mindful of the following reminders.

  1. Making a fist with one hand and slapping the top of it with your other hand is considered rude. 
  2. The American OK sign which is made by forming a circle using the thumb and index finger while the rest of the fingers are straight, can mean “zero” or “worthless”. Avoid it to avoid getting misinterpreted. The French OK sign is the thumbs up sign.

3. Shaking hands is for formal transactions and acquaintances. If you’re greeting someone familiar to you, you’re better off greeting the person with a “la bise” or kiss on the cheek. 

4. Do not give a present of red carnations. This flower represents bad will in France. 

5. Chrysanthemums are not great as gifts either. Mums are usually reserved for mourning. 

6. Holding an umbrella open indoors may be considered as bad luck. 

7. In other cultures, it is perfectly okay to bring wine to someone’s house when you’re invited for dinner. But in old France custom, some people might consider this as an insult that the host could not provide the guests with good wine. Unless you’re quite familiar with the hosts and you’re bringing a good wine that you would like them to try. 

(Author’s note: I personally like to bring wine or champagne when invited to friend’s houses. Why? So that there would be more booze, of course! So maybe this custom is no longer very appropriate in modern cases.)

8. Presenting red roses to your hostess can be thought of as inappropriate behavior. Red roses mean an expression of love. Avoid giving it to casual or professional acquaintances as well. Unless, you do mean to woo the person. 

9. Bring a present when visiting your friends’ or relatives’ homes. Flowers are good (except for those mentioned above), and are usually given in odd numbers except thirteen which means bad luck. 

10. Always dress well when stepping out in public. It would help if you don’t dress up like a fashion terrorist.

11. It is considered respectful for a man to stand up or show the inclination to do so when a superior enters the room or joins the group. 

12. Snapping your fingers is considered offensive. 

13. Chewing gum in public is a no-no and could come across as vulgar. 

14. When pointing to a certain direction, use your whole hand to do so. Do not use your index finger to point. 

15. Do not sit with your legs spread apart. The French consider this impolite. 

☀︎ Dining

Of course, this is one topic that calls for a long list. Dining is an important part of French culture. Avoid social gaffes and take not of these tips.

  1. When in cafés, never ever complain about how long your order is taking. Part of the whole experience is enjoying yourselves and relaxing. This is not the place to rush. 
  2. Do not order one dish only when you’re dining in a restaurant.
  3. Soft drinks are not to be drunk with a good meal. 
  4. Don’t ask for a doggy bag.

☀︎ Cute, but nope. 

5. Parisian cafés do not add ice on their drinks. Do not expect or demand for any. 

6. Wait for the host or hostess to say “bon appetit!” before you start to dig in on your food. 

7. Place your table napkin on your lap immediately when you are seated. 

8. Eat slowly. Do not inhale all your food in one go. 

9. Make eye contact as you say “santé” to the other people in the table. It literally means that you are wishing them good health and is deemed polite. 

10. Avoid leaving food on your plate. This means you did not enjoy the quality of the food, or it suggests that the host does not know how to serve proper potions. 

11. Don’t serve yourself wine first. As a proper courtesy to everyone else in the table, ask them if they want wine before you pour some for yourself. 

12. If the wine has just been opened, pour a little bit into your own glass first so that the little pieces of cork don’t end up in someone else’s glass. 

13. Avoid putting a piece of bread in your plate. Instead, place it on the table right beside your plate. 

14. Only bite directly into a piece of bread if there is something spread on top of it. Otherwise, break it into a small piece before you eat it. 

15. Unless a certain type of food needs to be dealt by hand, touching food with your fingers is strictly limited at the dinner table. 

16. Don’t place your elbows on top of the table. 

17. Keep your hands on the table not under it. 

18. Refrain from crossing your knife and fork on top of your plate. This signifies that you haven’t eaten enough. 

19. Don’t place the loaf of bread upside down. This is considered bad luck. 

20. After a course, wipe your plate with a piece of bread for the next dish ( use a piece of bread on your fork)

So there you go. Don’t you feel more polite already? Re-read this list time and again to remind you how not to act in France. © Frederic Bibard / Talkin french

▫️ BITS & PIECES

✏️ Facebook – I am hoping to hear from them this weekend that my account has been completely deleted. When reading this article, I am pleased I took the decision to close all accounts related to Facebook.

▫️ MUSIC

🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶

Celebrity spotlight

George Harrison & Pattie Boyd

▫️ TRAVEL NEWS

Travel Page

Up to date

17/09: The US may not reopen its borders to travellers from Europe until 2022.
17/09: India plans to issue tourist visas to vaccinated people, but no date has yet been announced.
15/09: Chile will reopen its land and air borders on 1 October and reduce the quarantine period to 5 days.
15/09: Indonesia aims to reopen its borders in November.
15/09 : Cambodia plans to reopen its borders to vaccinated people in November.
15/09 : From 15 October, covid tests for foreign travel will no longer be covered by health insurance.
13/09 : Germany has removed Corsica, Reunion and Occitanie from the list of “high risk areas”. Unvaccinated people coming from these regions should therefore no longer be quarantined.
13/09: Unvaccinated persons must now present a PCR test less than 72 hours old to enter Albania.
13/09: Senegal is reportedly reopening its borders to European tourists, but the information remains to be verified.
13/09 : Vietnam confirms the reopening of Phu Quoc Island in October.
13/09 : Thailand confirms the reopening of several destinations in October including Bangkok, Hua Hin, Chiang Mai and Pattaya.
10/09: US and Israel move from green to orange in France’s rating.
09/09: Malawi has reopened its borders.

▫️ FUN

▫️ SATIRE

▫️ THE FABULOUS FRIDAY (FUNNIES) GROANS from Paul

Another week goes by….

✒︎ Masks don’t work! A young woman was heard commenting:
“My boyfriend and I wear a mask all the time, but I still got pregnant!”

✒︎ Some short humour  

⚬ I bought the missus one of them posh candles; I asked the lady how long
does it last. She said 1 wick.


⚬ It was the inventor of the dishwasher’s funeral today. The coffin was
lowered into the ground only to be taken out by his wife and put back
in properly.


⚬ Client: “How much to answer 3 questions?”
Lawyer: “£500.”
Client: “That’s expensive, isn’t it?”
Lawyer: “Yes, now what’s your 3rd question??”


⚬ I’ve just been speaking to the tailor who has just moved in next door.  He seams nice.


⚬ If you suck at playing the trumpet that’s probably why.

✒︎ An elderly man was quite unhappy because he had lost his favourite hat. Rather than purchasing a new one, he decided he would go to church and steal one out of the vestibule. 

When he got there, an usher intercepted him at the door and took him to a pew where he had to sit and listen to an entire sermon on the Ten Commandments.

After church, the man met the preacher in the vestibule doorway, shook his hand vigorously and said, 

“I want to thank you for saving my soul today, preacher. I came to church to steal
a hat, but after hearing your sermon on the Ten Commandments, I decided against it.”

“You mean the Commandment, Thou shall not steal, changed your mind?” the preacher asked.

“No, the one about adultery did,” the old man said. “As soon as you said that, I remembered where I left my old hat.”

✒︎ 10 reasons why English is weird… 

1. The bandage was wound around the wound.

2. The farm was used to produce produce.

3. The dump was so full that it had to refuse refuse.

4. We must polish the Polish furniture.

5. He could lead if he could get the lead out.

6. The soldier decided to desert his dessert in the desert.

7. Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was     time to present the present.

8. A bass was painted on the head of the bass drum.

9. When shot at, the dove dove into the bushes.

10. I did not object to the object.

✒︎ Some really corny riddles,  part one…

What do you call a Spaniard who has lost his car?  Carlos.

What do you call a Norwegian in a tree?  Leif.

One for the older ones amongst us:  What do you call a guy sitting in your letterbox?  Bill.

What do you call a guy walking through autumn leaves?  Russell.

What do you call a guy hanging on the wall?  Art.

What do you call a guy standing at the seashore holding back the waves?  Cliff.

What do you call a woman with one leg shorter than the other?  Eileen.

What do you call a guy sitting outside your door?  Mat.

✒︎ Two storks are sitting in their nest:

A father stork and a young stork. The young stork is crying and Father
stork is trying to calm him:

“Don’t worry, son, your mother will come back. She’s only bringing
people babies and making them happy.”

The next evening it’s Father’s turn to do the job. Mother and son are
sitting in the nest.

The young stork is crying and his mother is saying.

“Son, your father will be back as soon as possible, but now he’s
bringing joy to new mummies and daddies.”

A few days later, the stork’s parents are worried for their son has been
absent from the nest all night!

Shortly before dawn, he returns and his Parents ask where he’s been all
night.

The young stork says.

“Nowhere in particular. Just mostly scaring teenagers!”

✒︎ Me: “So, a pedant is someone who takes everything literally?”
Pedant: “No, that’s a kleptomaniac”

✒︎ Two groaners…

⚬ “Don’t worry, I can stay out as late as I want to tonight,” Joe told his friend Bob. “My wife’s 

gone for a two-week vacation in the Caribbean.”

“Jamaica?” Bob asked.

“No, it was her idea.”


⚬ A man walks into a doctor’s office and says, “Doc, you have to help. I think I’m a dog.”

The doctor says, “How long have you had this feeling?”

The man responds, “Ever since I was a puppy.”

✒︎A very lazy employee asked for a reference when she was fired.  The boss thought for a bit, then wrote:
If you get Mary Jones to work for you, you’ll be very lucky.

✒︎”I get those maternal feelings sometimes, like when I’m lying on the couch and can’t reach the remote, I think, ‘Boy, a kid would be nice right now.'” –Kathleen Madigan

✒︎My broker called me this morning and said, “Remember that stock we bought and I said you’d be able to retire at age 65?”
“Yes, I remember,” I said.
“Well,” my broker continued, “your retirement age is now 98.”

✒︎ Having just moved into his new office, a pompous, new colonel was
sitting at his desk when an airman knocked on the door.

Conscious of his new position, the colonel quickly picked up the phone,
told the airman to enter, then said into the phone, “Yes, General, I’ll
be seeing him this afternoon and I’ll pass along your message. In the
meantime, thank you for your good wishes, sir.”

Feeling as though he had sufficiently impressed the young enlisted man, he asked, “What do you want?

“Nothing important, sir,” the airman replied, “I’m just here to hook up your telephone.”


✒︎ Q: What does a cannibal call a skateboarder?

A: Meals on wheels!


✒︎ Q: What airline do ghosts fly with?

A: British Scareways!


✒︎ Q: What do you get when you cross a stream and a brook?

A: Wet feet.


✒︎ Q: Why doesn’t Dracula have any friends?

A: Because he’s a pain in the neck!


✒︎ Q:What do you call a haunted wigwam?

A: A creepy tee-pee.


✒︎ Q: How do you stop an elephant from charging?

A: Unplug it!


✒︎ Q: What do you call a big Irish spider?

A: Paddy long legs!


✒︎ Q: What do sprinters eat before a race?

A: Nothing. They fast.

See you in the soup.

▫️ NEWS FROM ACROSS THE POND 🇺🇸

Some more gems from crazy USA

▫️ ADDITIONAL READS FOR TODAY

🔸 Scientists find evidence of humans making clothes 120,000 years ago

🏠

Posted in Health and fitness | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Friends and bits

A few days away

Draft

Day 1

Spent the night in Narbonne on Friday to be able to pick-up my friend P from the train station very early Saturday.

From we had a very pleasant drive to Marseille. went straight to my preferred car park and walked along to the Vieux Port. Brilliant weather. The old ship on the photo is called SeaCloud II and I need to investigate what it is all about.

A bit early to go to the planned restaurant but not too early for an aperitif. Why is it that I always break my non-drinking periods every time I am in Marseille? Anyway, I cannot think of a better spot to enjoy a pre-lunch drink.

The restaurant „Relais 50“ is a few yards away and we are quickly there. As usual, the service is excellent and friendly. The food is also very good.

Later in the afternoon we take the coastal road to Six Four les Plages via Cassis, La Ciotat, St Cyr sur Mer & Bandol. A very pleasant drive indeed and far away from the motorway.

We arrive late afternoon. We have time to catch with our 3 friends and I have to admit some catching up was needed. In my case I had not seen Ri for just over 45 years (on my wedding day to be precise).

It is then time for apéritif and dinner outside.

At this point, I must note that my French friends and family appear to all be fans of the so-called Prosecco Spritzer.

Over 5 years ago it was also the rage in Germany. Rumours are that the Italian company has produced too much Aperol and has a major advertising campaign to try and reduce inventories.

Off to bed not too late as we expect a fairly busy day tomorrow and more to the point some of us (me) are not feeling too brilliant.

Day 2

To start the day P & Re go down to the beach with another friend for a swim in the bay. Ri, myself and C stay in for a bit of breakfast and in my case download the daily Covid-19 data.

The weather is excellent and the view from my friend’s house is always worth it.

We have time for coffee at the port

As soon as we see the boat entering the port, we join the queue to board.

The crossing only take a few minutes to the Ile des Embiers which is where my friend Re is mooring his own boat.

But first it is lunch time in the Sarti restaurant where reservations had been made.

The location is great, the drinks good and the company excellent. The food could have been a bit better. One could see it was the end of the summer season.

The plan is for the 9 of us to go to the boat for a ride and swim in the open sea.

Back at the port a couple of hours ago. We wanted to play a game of pétanque, a couple of our friends are more or less pros and it would have been nice to measure ourselves against them. Unfortunately, my kidney or rather my “supposed-to-be-on-the-way-kidney-stones” are playing up rather badly so we abandon the plan and head back to the mainland.

For dinner Cr has prepared an excellent Soupe au Pistou which as everyone knows is quite a local dish and was one of my mum’s speciality.

Again not a late night, especially for me.

Day 3

Renaud’s birthday

Same as yesterday, Re & P go for an early swim

Quite a few guests are expected for lunch and a paella for 15 people is being prepared.

The result is great

Soon it is time for the lunch time apéritif as the crowd turns up sharp. Everyone has to give a hand.

We have an excellent lunch with great company with friends who all live locally.

However it is time for P & myself to leave the place as we are expected in Cavalaire later on. It is always a bit heart breaking for me. I really feel at home there.

It is not a long drive along the coast. Just the usual slow down approaching Toulon.

But it is worth it when we reach the apartment where my brother and his wife are waiting for us. As I have written before, I shall never tire of the view.

It is soon time for yet another apéritif and we decide to go down in town for a couple more drinks (3 bottles of Rosé in fact) and a small bite to eat at the Rôtisseurs de la Côte (as usual).

Night cap consisting of Mandarine from Cabanel (Carcassone) back home looking at the stars. I have to admit that this last drink might have been slightly superfluous. On the other hand my pains disappeared and I could enjoy a fairly good night.

Day 4

The plan is to go to St Tropez because Tuesday is market day there. We set off by 9am and make the mistake not to take the back roads. The last 5 kilometres are chock-a-block with cars. Just like in the middle of August. We notice that there is a very large amount of Germans on the road.

We finally make it and are lucky to find a parking space under the Hotel de Paris.

First a coffee at the harbour to have a look at the boats. We avoided Senequier and went to the Café de Paris instead.

I fell in love with that boat from Norway

Shopping had to be done as planned, local cheese among other things.

We also bought some fish for lunch. A nice Mérou (Grouper in 🇬🇧 ?) and a colourful Chapon (Capon 🇬🇧 ).

Cooking is simple and the usual way. Fish in a dish lying on sticks of fennel, some “groundnut oil” and the very important splash of Pastis. Oven at 180ºC for 40 minutes which gives ample time for a couple of glasses of Rosé for apéritif.

Maybe it was a little bit more as a couple of glasses of Rosé so a little nap was needed after lunch. My friend P and I decided to go down into town for a walk around and more importantly a couple of drinks at my local (formerly known as the Galiote).

As we are people of habit, we went back home up the hill for a pre-apéritif before going back to town, just like the evening before for a drink and a bite to eat.

Day 5

Time to go home and leave town. It always gets me down to leave the place. I would not live there all year long but would gladly spend more time.

Fortunately we had planned to visit our friend A in Hyères. That was very pleasant and P & A had not seen each other in over 40 years. So of course out came the Rosé. Only one glass for me mind you as I had to drive home. I arrived in Carcassone at around 5pm after having dropped P in Narbonne on the way.

An excellent few days. To be repeated as often as possible.

Posted in Friends, Holidays, Places | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

And again 1/43’s

My supplier has been away all summer, therefore orders placed in May & June are only just materialising. Anyway, these 2 have now arrived.

Ligier JS2 (Maserati) which ran at Le Mans in 1974

The car from the Pescarolo team in 2000

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Daily Post – Septembre 7th

Living through a pandemic

in the south of France

536 days in Carcassonne since

1st lockdown in March 2020

DAILY STATISTICS HERE

▫️ HOME NEWS DESK

A very hot and humid & cloudy weather in our part of the world this morning. It was announced earlier on the radio that one should do as little as possible.

And what did I do? I was the 1st patient at the hospital for my yearly heart ❤️ stress test which as everyone knows means pedalling till exhaustion on a static bicycle.

I was not sure I was going to make it due to the various issues and catheter in place since last week but I did it and all is well. At last some good news.

✏️ Daily update – National

CONTAMINATIONS
On Monday 6 September, 3,042 new cases of Covid-19 were recorded in 24 hours, according to figures from Santé publique France, bringing the total number of confirmed cases since the start of the epidemic to 6,839,494.

The positivity rate, which measures the number of positive cases in relation to the number of people tested, stands at 2.4%.

HOSPITALISATIONS
The number of patients hospitalised rose slightly to 10,757 from 10,644 on Sunday.

The critical care services, which receive the most seriously ill patients, had 2,249 patients, including 187 admitted in the last 24 hours.

DEATHS
In 24 hours, 103 people have died in hospital from Covid. The total death toll since the beginning of the epidemic is 115,007, of which 88,339 have died in hospital.

VACCINATION
On the vaccination front, 49,198,166 people have received at least one injection (i.e. 73% of the total population) and 45,633,313 people now have a complete vaccination schedule (i.e. 67.7% of the total population).

✏️ Daily update – Regional

Thanks to the figures communicated this Monday 6 September by Santé publique France, here is the outcome of the epidemic in the Aude and Pyrénées-Orientales regions.

In the Aude, on 6 September, the number of people hospitalised for Covid reached 84 (-2), including 56 in conventional hospitalisation (-1 in 24 hours).

Among them, 14 are in critical care (-1).

The incidence rate continued to fall to 160 per 100,000 inhabitants in the rolling week from 28 August to 3 September, reported on Monday. It has been divided by three since its peak on 27 July at 480.

In the department, 396 deaths due to Covid are to be deplored in hospital, two more than on Sunday.

In Aude, 1,420 people have returned home since March, including 4 in 24 hours.

Incidence rate divided by 4 in the Pyrénées-Orientales
In the Pyrénées-Orientales on 30 August, 110 patients are being treated in hospital, 2 less than on Sunday, including 48 in conventional hospitalisation (-1).

Some 16 of them are being treated in critical care (resuscitation, intensive care or continuous monitoring), a figure that has remained stable over 24 hours.

In the rolling week from 28 August to 3 September, the incidence rate is still falling at 145 per 100,000. It has been divided by 4 since its peak of 637 on 25 July.

No deaths have been reported in the department since Saturday. In total, 389 people have died in hospital since March 2020.

Finally, 1,677 patients were able to return home, including 6 within 24 hours.

▫️ MORE DATA

I have been monitoring the number of monthly deaths, all reasons, in France (excluding overseas territories) as published officially by the INSEE.

Despite the 115k Covid related deaths so far, the average monthly death toll has not increased that much in 2020 and so far in 2021 compared to the 2 years preceding the pandemic. The effect of the lockdowns has meant fewer road accident related deaths. Social distancing and other hygienic measures in place have meant a greatly number of flu cases last winter and consequently less flu related deaths.

▫️ Covid-19: Does the Israeli example prove the ineffectiveness of the vaccine?

Until recently, Israel was a leader in the fight against Covid-19, but the country is now caught up in the fourth wave of the epidemic. With almost 11,000 cases of Covid-19 per 100,000 inhabitants recorded on the eve of the start of the school year, the Hebrew state reached a new record of daily infections last week. By way of comparison, it has the fourth highest infection rate in the world behind Georgia, Dominica and Cuba, where vaccination coverage is not as extensive.

Does this mean that the anti-Covid-19 serum is ineffective, as some have suggested? In reality, several factors can explain the figures recorded in Israel.

Vaccination at a standstill
The first factor put forward by the Israeli authorities is the omnipresence of the Delta variant, which is much more contagious than the previous strains. Indeed, contrary to the original strain, the reproduction rate of the virus, the famous R0, is no longer 2 or 3, but 6.4. In other words, the virus is now transmitted to around 260 individuals, compared to 15 to 40 previously.

If this criterion is indeed to be taken into consideration, it cannot however explain on its own the virulence of the rebound currently observed in Israel, since the Delta variant is also dominant in many other countries that do not record such worrying figures.

But in the face of this omnipresence of the Delta variant, the vaccination rate has hardly changed in recent months. However, the non-vaccinated remain an important reservoir for the circulation of the virus and do not allow the country to reach the threshold of collective immunity, estimated at 80% or 90% of the population. Thus, whereas last April, 55% of Israelis were already fully vaccinated, 60% are now. By way of comparison, France has gone from 15% to over 70% in the same period.

The demographic weight of children
In parallel with this vaccination campaign, which has run out of steam, the demographic weight of children also seems to be a factor in the equation, with 28% of the Israeli population aged 14 or under, according to the World Bank, while this rate does not exceed 20% in European countries, the Far East or the United States. However, with the exception of children aged 5 to 11 at risk of serious complications, it is still not possible to vaccinate children under 12.

Although the Israeli authorities extended vaccination to young people aged 12 to 16 at the beginning of June, only 33% of them are fully vaccinated. In France, on the eve of the start of the school year, nearly 45% of adolescents in this age group had received their two doses of vaccine and 62% were fully vaccinated.

Is a booster necessary?
In this context, Israel, one of the first countries in the world to have vaccinated the majority of its population of nine million, has launched a campaign in recent weeks for a third dose to improve the immune response of those vaccinated for more than six months, which has already been administered to about 2.5 million people.

Indeed, as in most countries, the first people vaccinated in the Hebrew state were the oldest and most fragile, which could explain why their immunity declines more quickly and why some of this population is currently on hospital wards.

It should be noted, however, that although 1,300 people are still hospitalised for Covid-19 in Israel, the situation seems to have stabilised since the end of August in hospitals, and that only 4.8% of severely affected patients are fully vaccinated, according to official data from the Hebrew State. This proves that vaccination does indeed protect against severe forms of the disease.

© LCI / Translation © J2S

▫️ MUSIC

🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶

Celebrity spotlight

Bob Dylan

▫️ TRAVEL NEWS

Travel Page

Up to date

▫️ FOOD & DRINKS

At this very moment, I am off food. So no comment available today.

▫️ FUN

▫️ SATIRE

▫️ NEWS FROM ACROSS THE POND 🇺🇸

Some more gems from crazy USA

▫️ ADDITIONAL READS FOR TODAY

📖 50 million?


Yes, that’s the number we will reach, probably by the end of the week. There will be 50 million people vaccinated against Covid in our country. With at least one dose. Despite the reluctance, the doubts, the questions, this is quite an achievement. Never in such a short time – less than nine months – have so many people been “stung” on our territory. This weekend, with the operation that allowed people to receive the serum without an appointment, the figure rose again: 67.4% of the population, or 45.5 million people according to the latest data communicated this morning by the Ministry of Health, are “immunised” with a complete vaccination scheme. A term that does not mean that one cannot catch the virus and transmit it.


It’s still far from over


The injections from Pfizer, Moderna, Janssen or AstraZeneca do, however, make it possible to avoid a serious form of the disease and to be less contagious. This is a strong way to protect yourself against Covid, which has been disabling our daily lives for more than a year and a half. Of course, the health pass – which again drew some 140,000 demonstrators on Saturday, but whose introduction made it possible to speed up vaccination – is still there, and the authorities are not hiding the fact that it could remain compulsory after 15 November. And let’s not forget the great disparities behind these 50 million vaccinated people. There is an urgent need to catch up in Polynesia and the West Indies, where the epidemic is taking its toll. In certain neighbourhoods too, such as Marseille or Creil. And let’s not forget our elderly. About 11% of the over 75s, who are at high risk, have not been vaccinated, and it is a government priority to reach them. According to statistics released today, nearly 89.8 million injections have been given since the campaign was launched on 27 December. There is still a long way to go.

© Laurence Le Fur – Parisien / Translation © J2S

🏠

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Additional 1/43’s

Received a couple of miniatures today which I had ordered weeks ago. I have actually seen both cars racing at Le Mans .

I am particularly pleased with the Rondeau designed and built by a local Le Mans guy who unfortunately was killed in a fatal accident (hit by a train) far too early in 1985.

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Daily Post – Septembre 6th

Living through a pandemic

in the south of France

535 days in Carcassonne since

1st lockdown in March 2020

DAILY STATISTICS HERE

▫️ HOME NEWS DESK

A new week has started and I am looking forward to it. In a few days I am off to meet up with a group of school friends. A couple of them I have not seen in 40 years mainly due to the fact that I have lived abroad all that time.

✏️ Daily update – National

CONTAMINATIONS
This Sunday 5 September, 10,410 new cases of Covid-19 were recorded in 24 hours, according to figures from Santé publique France, bringing the total number of confirmed cases since the beginning of the epidemic to 6,836,452. The positivity rate, which measures the number of positive cases in relation to the number of people tested, was 2.5%, identical to the previous day.

HOSPITALISATIONS
The number of patients hospitalised, which had fallen back below 11,000 on Thursday, fell again slightly to 10,644 from 10,654 on Saturday, with 227 patients admitted in the last 24 hours. The critical care units, which receive the most seriously ill patients, now have 2,217 patients – including 60 admitted in the last 24 hours – compared to 2,223 on Friday.

For the past ten days, the number of patients admitted to intensive care units has fluctuated between 2,200 and nearly 2,300 without showing a clear downward trend.

DEATHS
In 24 hours, 49 people have been killed by Covid, bringing the total death toll to 114,905 since the beginning of the epidemic.

VACCINATION
On the vaccination front, 49,128,555 people have received at least one injection (i.e. 72.9% of the total population) and 45,455,314 people now have a complete vaccination schedule (i.e. 67.4% of the total population).

▫️ MUSIC

🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶

My monthly statistics for last month compiled by Deezer

There was another excellent TV show on ARTE about the Beatles which prompted me to spend some time listening to some of my favorites from them.

▫️ TRAVEL NEWS

Travel Page. has been updated with the latest information below:

03/09: Panama: Unvaccinated people from the following countries must remain in quarantine for three days: United States, Cuba, Guatemala, Costa Rica, French Guiana, United Kingdom, Greece, Georgia, Estonia, Serbia, Macedonia, Montenegro, Azerbaijan, Israel, Malaysia, Mongolia, South Africa, Guinea Bissau, Tunisia and Fiji.
03/09: Montenegro now requires either a certificate of vaccination, a PCR test less than 72 hours old or an antigenic test less than 48 hours old, or an attestation of having been infected by covid.

▫️ FOOD & DRINKS

At this very moment, I am off food. So no comment available today.

▫️ FUN

▫️ SATIRE

▫️ NEWS FROM ACROSS THE POND 🇺🇸

Some more gems from crazy USA

▫️ ADDITIONAL READS FOR TODAY

I have not had time yet to read the press today

🏠

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Daily Post – Septembre 4th

Living through a pandemic

in the south of France

533 days in Carcassonne since

1st lockdown in March 2020

DAILY STATISTICS HERE

Happy 45th anniversary to us (C & JJ)

▫️ NEWS DESK

Home is much more comfortable.

✏️ Daily update – National

CONTAMINATIONS
This Friday 3 September, 13,466 new cases of Covid-19 were recorded in 24 hours, according to figures from Santé publique France, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 6,812,706 since the beginning of the epidemic. The positivity rate, which measures the number of positive cases in relation to the number of people tested, was 2.6%, identical to the previous day.

HOSPITALISATIONS
The number of patients hospitalised, which had fallen back below the 11,000 mark on Thursday, fell again slightly, to 10,816 compared with 10,934 the previous day, with 624 patients admitted in the last 24 hours. The critical care units, which receive the most seriously ill patients, now have 2,259 patients – including 159 admitted in the last 24 hours – compared to 2,275 on Thursday.

For the past ten days, the number of patients admitted to intensive care units has fluctuated between 2,200 and nearly 2,300 without showing a clear downward trend. Hospital pressure remains particularly strong in Bouches-du-Rhône (934 hospitalised, including 218 in critical care), Martinique (719, including 165) and Guadeloupe (600, including 83).

DEATHS
95 people have died of Covid-19 in hospitals in the last 24 hours, bringing the total number of deaths in this epidemic in France to 114,773.

VACCINATION
Since the beginning of the vaccination campaign, 48,995,073 people have received at least one injection (i.e. 72.7% of the total population) and 45,140,579 people have now received the full vaccination schedule (i.e. 67% of the total population).

✏️ Daily update – Regional

The figures relating to the epidemic of Covid-19 communicated this Friday by Santé publique France.

In Aude, 94 patients were hospitalised on Tuesday because of Covid-19, the same number as on Thursday. Among them, 15 are in intensive care (stable figure), 65 in conventional hospitalisation (-1), 13 in follow-up care or long-term care (+1) and 1 in other structures (stable). 2 people were able to go home (1,401 in total since the beginning of the epidemic). No deaths have been reported in the department in the last 24 hours. In total, Covid-19 has killed 394 people in Aude since the beginning of the epidemic.

The incidence rate is falling this Friday and has fallen below the 200 mark to 191.3 cases per 100,000 inhabitants in the week from 25 to 31 August. However, 200 is the critical threshold set by Emmanuel Macron on 12 July for territorial braking measures. Under these conditions, the prefect of the Aude, Thierry Bonnier, had the possibility of putting an end to the restriction measures he had imposed. But in a press release issued on Friday, the prefecture announced that “the wearing of masks remains compulsory outdoors in areas with a high concentration of people such as open-air markets, the vicinity of schools, particularly at school entry and exit times, shopping streets when there is a large number of people, the vicinity of railway stations and public transport waiting areas, the vicinity of places of worship when entering and leaving services and in all queues, whether in open, covered or closed areas.


In the Pyrénées-Orientales, the number of Covid patients hospitalised is also stable this Friday (112). 18 people are in intensive care (as many as on Thursday), 47 in conventional hospitalization (stable figure), 33 in follow-up care or long-term care (+1) and 14 in other structures (stable). 2 people were able to go home (1,666 in all since the beginning of the epidemic). Two additional deaths are to be deplored in the department this Friday. In the Pyrénées-Orientales, the coronavirus has caused a total of 389 victims in hospital since the beginning of the epidemic, including 9 in the last five days.

In the rolling week from 25 to 31 August, the incidence rate continued to fall to 164.1 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. It was 175.8 in the week from 24 to 30 August.

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▫️ MUSIC

🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶

Celebrity spotlight

“If jazz means anything, it is freedom of expression.” Duke Ellington

▫️ TRAVEL NEWS

Travel Page. has been updated with the latest information below:

02/09: Vaccinated people no longer need a PCR test to enter Panama.
02/09: Australia will not reopen its borders until 17 December.
02/09: Argentina, Chile and Uruguay show first signs of reopening to tourists.
02/09 : Thailand: five more provinces, including Bangkok, are expected to be ready to welcome visitors from October, followed by 21 more provinces across the country.
01/09: Albania will require either a vaccination certificate, a PCR test less than 72 hours old, an antigen test less than 48 hours old, or proof of having been infected with covid from 6 September.
01/09 : French and European travellers are again exempted from short-stay visa requirements for entry into South Korea, but must obtain an electronic travel authorisation and comply with a 14-day quarantine.
01/09: Vaccinated persons can now travel freely in Mauritius from the 8th day onwards (until now it was from the 15th day).
01/09: Oman has reopened its borders without quarantine to vaccinated people.
01/09: North Macedonia now requires either a certificate of vaccination, a PCR test less than 72 hours old, or a statement of having been infected with covid.
01/09: Only vaccinated people can now enter the Turks and Caicos Islands.
31/08: Malawi has reopened its borders. Source: Government press release received by email
31/08 : The 100% digital evisa for Thailand will be implemented from September 18th. Travelling to the Paris embassy to apply for a visa will no longer be necessary.
31/08 : From September 7, Canada will reopen its borders without quarantine to all vaccinated foreigners.

▫️ FOOD & DRINKS

At this very moment, I am off food. So no comment available today.

▫️ FUN

For the youngsters out there

▫️ SATIRE

▫️ NEWS FROM ACROSS THE POND 🇺🇸

Some more gems from crazy USA

▫️ ADDITIONAL READS FOR TODAY

Soon, a historical era will come to an end in Europe. 67-year-old Angela Merkel, modern Germany’s second-longest-serving chancellor after Helmut Kohl, is not on her country’s September 26 election ballot. Kohl dedicated his political life to rebuilding Germany within a united Europe following World War II, and led the governing center-right Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party, continuing at the helm of a reunified Germany from 1990 to 1998.

Merkel won a seat in the Bundestag, the lower house of parliament, in Germany’s first post-reunification election in 1990. She became Kohl’s protégée, until April 2000, when Merkel was elected head of the CDU, becoming the first woman and first non-Catholic to lead the party. After the 2005 general election resulted in a stalemate for both major parties, a coalition government was formed with Merkel at its head. On November 22, 2005 Merkel took office as chancellor — the first woman, the first East German, and, at age 51, the youngest person to date to hold the office. 

Over the next 16 years, Merkel achieved status as a global diplomatic heavyweight, deftly managing a succession of crises, including tackling the financial meltdown in 2007-2008. She helped implement major reforms and policies on healthcare, energy management, and migration. She reduced unemployment, ended military conscription, enabled the legalization of same-sex marriage, introduced a national minimum wage, and raised payments to new parents. She pushed through a later retirement age, put more women in senior government posts, and set Germany on a course for a future without nuclear and fossil-fueled power.

Internationally, Merkel sought compromise and pursued a multilateral approach to the world’s problems through turbulent years that saw the U.S. drift apart from European allies under former president Trump, and Great Britain leaving the E.U. Time Magazine once dubbed her the “Chancellor of the Free World,” and she topped the 2018 Forbes list of the “World’s Most Powerful Women.” And in the twilight of her career, she led a COVID response that saw Germany fare better than some of its peers. 

Ralph Bollmann, a journalist and Merkel’s biographer, said: “I think [her] most important legacy is simply that, in such a time of worldwide crises, she provided for stability.” Through “a constant succession of crises that were really existential threats … her achievement is that she led Germany, Europe and perhaps to some extent the world fairly safely through that, for all that you can criticize details.” When Merkel insists others must judge her record, Bollmann answers: “You protected our country well.”

© (Independent, Britannica, AP)

🏠

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Daily Post – Septembre 3rd

Living through a pandemic

in the south of France

532 days in Carcassonne since

1st lockdown in March 2020

DAILY STATISTICS HERE

▫️ TEMPORARY NEWS DESK

Once I was able to get up yesterday, I rearranged some of the furniture in my room in order to create a little office corner. Not too easy with tranfusion pouches on tow and a somewhat uncomfortable catheter to cope with but time was on my hand.

✏️ Daily update – National

CONTAMINATIONS

This Thursday, September 2, 15,911 new cases of Covid-19 were counted in 24 hours, according to figures from Santé publique France, bringing the total number of confirmed cases since the beginning of the epidemic to 6,799,240. The positivity rate, which measures the number of positive cases in relation to the number of people tested, stands at 2.6% compared to 2.8% yesterday.

HOSPITALISATIONS

French hospitals have recorded 10,934 Covid patients, including 648 admitted in the last 24 hours. For the first time since 22 August, the number of patients admitted to hospital has fallen below the 11,000 mark.

Hospital pressure remains high in three departments: Bouches-du-Rhône (967 people hospitalised), Martinique (727) and Guadeloupe (586).

The critical care services, which receive patients with the most serious forms of the disease, are treating 2,275 patients, 143 of whom were admitted between Wednesday and Thursday. There were 2,294 the day before and 2,261 last Thursday.

For the past ten days, the number of patients admitted to these intensive care units has oscillated between 2,200 and nearly 2,300 without showing a clear downward trend.

DEATHS

104 people have died of Covid-19 in hospitals in the last 24 hours, bringing the total number of deaths in this epidemic in France to 114,680.

VACCINATION

Since the beginning of the vaccination campaign in France, 48,877,298 people have received at least one injection (i.e. 72.5% of the total population) and 44,838,424 people have now received the full vaccination schedule (i.e. 66.5% of the total population).

✏️ Daily update – Regional

To be made available later

The incidence rate continues its slow decrease

✏️ Useless statistic

I just saw this statement on TV: Concern about the spread of the virus falls sharply to 57%, down 10 points since 20/08.

What does it mean? How is it measured? By whom?

✏️

▫️SEEKING A POLLUTION SOLUTION

Cities in India routinely dominate global pollution rankings; toxic air kills more than a million Indians annually. A new report by The Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC) says that 480 million people in northern India face the “most extreme levels of air pollution in the world.”

The study found pollution levels that are “10 times worse than those found anywhere else in the world.” Data from the EPIC report on Air Quality Life Index shows that residents in India’s capital of Delhi could see up to 10 years added to their lives if air pollution was reduced to meet the World Health Organization guideline of 10 µg/m³.

High pollution levels also affect lives in western and central Indian states such as Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh, where the average person is now losing 2.5 to 3 years of life expectancy as compared to early 2000. According to the report, Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan, which together account for nearly a quarter of the global population, consistently figure in the top five most polluted countries on earth.

▫️ MUSIC

🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶

Celebrity spotlight

This one is for Michael

▫️ TRAVEL NEWS

Travel Page. has not been updated with the latest information available:

▫️ FOOD & DRINKS

Keto Mojito

Just what I could do with

Cocktails make the BEST keto summer drinks. Commonly served hard liquors contain 0g net carbs, so a sugar-free mojito with vodka is perfect.

Ingredients

  • 3-4 mint leaves
  • 3 tbsp water
  • 1 tbsp swerve
  • 1 lime
  • 1 tbsp unsweetened coconut flakes
  • 1 oz vodka
  • 4 oz coconut sparkling water

Instructions

  1. Add water. swerve. and coconut flakes to a saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat.
  2. Cut lime in half. Juice 1/2 lime into glass. Save the remaining half for garnish
  3. Add 3-4 mint leaves
  4. Pour homemade simple syrup into glass
  5. Muddle
  6. Add ice, vodka, and sparkling water and stir
  7. Garnish with a fresh lime slice

▫️ FUN

▫️ SATIRE

▫️ NEWS FROM ACROSS THE POND 🇺🇸

Some more gems from crazy USA

▫️ ADDITIONAL READS FOR TODAY

Monkeying Around

Here’s a research project worth giggling about. According to a study published Tuesday in Biology Letters, the laughing patterns of human infants match those of great apes. Human adults primarily laugh while exhaling, whereas infants and great apes laugh during both inhalation and exhalation.

The author of the study is Mariska Kret, associate professor of cognitive psychology at Leiden University in the Netherlands. Kret originally discovered this phenomenon while attending a talk by renowned primatologist Jan van Hooff with a friend. When van Hooff said apes laugh during inhalation and exhalation, Kret’s friend showed a video of her baby laughing in the same manner. 

Kret was intrigued. So to test whether infants laugh like apes, Kret collected audio clips of laughing babies ages 3 months to 18 months. Then, she asked novice listeners to rate what percentage of the laugh was produced by inhaling versus exhaling. As a control, researchers included five clips of adults laughing. After two rounds, including at least 100 listeners each, the amateur listeners concluded that infants laughed both while inhaling and exhaling, whereas adults mainly laughed by exhaling. Kret then had expert listeners analyze the sound bites, and they reached virtually the same conclusions. 

The researchers also learned that listeners perceived the laughter produced by exhaling more positively, pleasanter, and more contagious. Adults do it by inhaling first, then producing “ha-ha-ha” sounds in short bursts, starting loud, then fading away. “The ape-type is more difficult to describe but there is an alternation huh-ha-huh-ha,” Kret said. 

Marina Davila-Ross, a reader in comparative psychology at England’s University of Portsmouth, wasn’t involved in the study, but wants us to know that infant laughter isn’t necessarily similar to all species of great apes, just those that are evolutionarily closest to humans, like chimpanzees and bonobos. “It seems to reflect that laughter is to some extent biologically deeply grounded,” she explained. 

Kret’s research also shows that older infants produced more exhaling laughter than younger ones, which she says may mean they’re learning the “communicative function” of laughter. In future research Kret hopes to repeat her experiment with other vocalizations, such as crying. But for now, she’ll continue running more of those laughter experiments, which I think we can all agree is pretty funny.

🏠

Posted in Health and fitness | Leave a comment

Daily Post – Septembre 2nd

Living through a pandemic

in the south of France

531 days in Carcassonne since

1st lockdown in March 2020

DAILY STATISTICS HERE

▫️ TEMPORARY NEWS DESK

I have managed to get in the hospital WIFI but is so slow that it is best to link my tablet to my phone‘s hot spot & 4G.

✏️ Daily update – National

CONTAMINATIONS

On Wednesday 1 September, 17,621 new cases of Covid-19 were recorded in 24 hours, according to figures from Santé publique France, bringing the total number of confirmed cases since the start of the epidemic to 6,783,329. The positivity rate, which measures the number of positive cases in relation to the number of people tested, stands at 2.8%.

HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS

The number of hospitalised patients has stabilised over the past week at between 11,000 and 11,200 people. On Wednesday, it was 11,119 patients, including some 2,300 in intensive care.

The intensive care units, which receive the most severe forms of Covid-19, are treating 2,294 patients. This figure has tended to increase very slowly over the past week (+55 in seven days), whereas it had increased more rapidly between 25 July and 25 August.

Hospital pressure remains high in three departments: Bouches-du-Rhône (945 people hospitalised), Martinique (789) and Guadeloupe (557).

DEATHS

85 people have died of Covid-19 in hospitals in the last 24 hours, bringing the total number of deaths in this epidemic in France to 114,577.

VACCINATION

Since the beginning of the vaccination campaign, 48,767,471 people have received at least one injection (72.3% of the total population), including 44,574,529 people with a complete vaccination schedule (66.1% of the population), according to the French Health Department.

France launched on Wednesday its booster vaccination campaign, known as the third dose, which concerns the oldest and most vulnerable people vaccinated six months ago or more.

✏️ Daily update – Regional

As every day, Santé Publique France communicated at the end of the afternoon the figures relating to the Covid-19 epidemic in the Aude and Pyrénées-Orientales.
In Aude, 96 Covid patients are hospitalised, 7 more than on Tuesday, including 15 in intensive care (-1). No deaths have been recorded in the last 24 hours in the department, the death toll in the Aude being 394 since the beginning of the epidemic.

In the Pyrénées-Orientales, 109 Covid patients are hospitalised (-4), including 19 in intensive care (stable figure). Three deaths have been recorded in the last 24 hours, bringing the total to 387 deaths since the beginning of the health crisis.

✏️ How appropriate

The JJ catheter is a thin, flexible tube (about 3mm in diameter) with ends that form a loop (hence the term double J) which allows the catheter to remain in place between the kidney and bladder. JJ catheters are inserted into the ureter, which is the channel through which urine flows from the kidney to the bladder.

✏️ No Horsing around

Ivermectin is an animal dewormer that is not approved for use in people with COVID. But when Julie Smith’s 51-year-old husband got so sick he had to be put into a medically-induced coma, she got a prescription from an Ohio doctor for the anti-parasite medication. When the hospital in West Chester Township, Ohio refused to administer the drug to Jeffrey Smith while he was seriously ill and on a ventilator, Julie filed a lawsuit.

On August 23, without stating his reasons, Butler County Judge J. Gregory Howard ordered the hospital to administer to Smith 30 milligrams of Ivermectin daily for 21 days. The FDA, the CDC, and the NIH have warned for months against using the drug to treat the coronavirus, saying its use can “cause serious harm.” (WaPo)

▫️ MUSIC

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Celebrity spotlight

The rebel – Jim Morrison

▫️ TRAVEL NEWS

Travel Page. has not been updated with the latest information available:

▫️ FOOD & DRINKS

New month means a new list of seasonal fruits and vegetables

(in French as usual)

▫️ FUN

▫️ SATIRE

A go at religion for a change

▫️ NEWS FROM ACROSS THE POND 🇺🇸

Some more gems from crazy USA

▫️ ADDITIONAL READS FOR TODAY

Inspiration4 Crew Will Take SpaceX Dragon Higher Into Space Than Anyone’s Gone in Nearly 15 Years

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Daily Post – Septembre 1st

Living through a pandemic

in the south of France

530 days in Carcassonne since

1st lockdown in March 2020

DAILY STATISTICS HERE

▫️ TEMPORARY NEWS DESK

✏️ Starting the new month in hospital but feeling ok for the time being. Not too sure what the next steps will be though. No doubt a doctor will come along later this morning and inform me of the plan.

✏️ Daily update – National

CONTAMINATIONS

This Tuesday, August 31, 19,425 new cases of Covid-19 have been reported in 24 hours, according to figures from Santé publique France, for a total of 6,765,708 confirmed cases since the beginning of the epidemic. The positivity rate, which measures the number of positive cases relative to the number of people tested, stands at 2.8 percent.

HOSPITALISATIONS

In 24 hours, 941 patients were admitted to hospitals, compared with 725 the day before. The intensive care units, which treat the most serious cases, received 2,292 patients, two more than the day before, and 2,221 seven days before. This indicator increased slightly over the last seven days, but at a much slower pace than between late July and mid-August.

DEATHS

136 people have died in hospitals in the last 24 hours, bringing the total number of deaths in France to 114,494.

VACCINATION

Since the beginning of the vaccination campaign, 48,638,743 people have received at least one injection, which is 72.1% of the total population. Among them, 44,260,593 people have now received a complete vaccination schedule (65.6% of the total population).

✏️ Daily update – Regional

The figures relating to the epidemic of Covid-19 communicated this Tuesday by Santé publique France.
In Aude, 89 patients are hospitalised this Tuesday because of Covid-19, 2 less than the day before. Among them, 16 are in intensive care (+1), 61 in conventional hospitalisation (-3) and 11 in follow-up or long-term care (-1). 3 people were able to go home (1,394 in total since the beginning of the epidemic). One additional hospital death has occurred in the department in the past 24 hours. In total, Covid-19 has killed 394 people in the department.

In the Pyrénées-Orientales, the number of Covid patients hospitalised is down this Tuesday (-8) to 113. 19 people are in intensive care (-1 in 24 hours), 48 in conventional hospitalisation (-7) and 32 in follow-up or long-term care (-1). Eight people were able to go home (1,655 in total since the beginning of the epidemic). If the department had not recorded any death linked to Covid-19 these last three days, the virus killed 4 people there this Tuesday. In the Pyrénées-Orientales, the coronavirus has caused a total of 384 hospital deaths since the beginning of the epidemic.

✏️ SCAM email received yesterday…

It looks real but it is a scam. Under no circumstances follow the link “Demander en ligne

▫️ MUSIC

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Celebrity spotlight

Françoise Hardy

▫️ TRAVEL NEWS

Travel Page. has been updated with the latest information available:

▫️ FOOD & DRINKS

Camembert cheese on the grill with candied tomatoes and olives


Serves 4: 1 Camembert, 50 g of candied tomatoes, 10 pitted black olives, a few sprigs of fresh thyme.


Thinly slice the tomato confit into pieces and cut the olives into slices.

Remove the Camembert from its packaging, place it on a sheet of baking paper and put it back in its box. Score the cheese with a knife. Place the filling on the Camembert, add the thyme leaves and fold the baking paper over before closing the box.

Place the tin on the barbecue grill over the coals and leave to melt for 10 to 12 minutes. Enjoy by dipping pieces of bread into the melted Camembert.

▫️ FUN

▫️ SATIRE

▫️ NEWS FROM ACROSS THE POND 🇺🇸

Some more gems from crazy USA

▫️ ADDITIONAL READS FOR TODAY

Zoom dysmorphia is following us into the real world

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